Map Updates – July 2016 – Issue 52

Extract from Trent & Mersey Canal Map
Extract from Trent & Mersey Canal Map

I’m pleased to announce the July 2016 updates to my cruising maps are now available.

You can see a full list of the latest issue of the maps, but those with significant changes this month are:-

 

 

Remember, you can update your map to the latest version – free during the first year and a small charge after that.  You can also upgrade to a larger map.  Just email paul@waterwayroutes.co.uk with details of your existing maps for a no obligation quote.

Happy customers

I am always pleased to receive feedback, and lots of my customers sent lovely feedback during June.

Extract from River Wey and Basingstoke Canal map.
Extract from River Wey and Basingstoke Canal map.

Here’s a few of their comments:-

Thank you Paul. Much appreciated. From MS, Kent – after I organised an update for his England & Wales map to the latest version at a discounted price.

Thanks for making such brilliant maps. These will help me move my new narrowboat to its new home. From JC, Yorkshire – after purchasing maps for the Aire & Calder Navigations, River Trent, and Sheffield & South Yorkshire Navigations.

Thanks for your help. The Acrobat (pdf) map is excellent. From SG, Warwickshire – after purchasing a Llangollen Canal Map.

Thank you for your help in ordering. We really enjoy the clear presentation of so much information. From DW, USA – after purchasing Ashby Canal and Coventry Canal maps.

Just to say I am a huge fan of Waterway Routes maps too. NF, Kent – leaving a comment on No Problem’s Blog after ordering several maps over the years.

I always welcome feedback.  Either email me, paul@waterwayroutes.co.uk, or leave a comment in this blog.  Thank you.

River Wey

We’re on the River Wey, filming for the planned River Wey and Basingstoke Canal DVDs.  With the recent wet weather it’s been a nightmare finding opportunities to film when the River Wey wasn’t in flood.  In the end, Monday and Tuesday provided enough great sunshine to film the River Wey.

Thames Lock
Thames Lock.

The River Wey joins the River Thames just below Shepperton Lock.  The last lock on the River Wey, as the water flows, but the first to be met by most boaters is Thames Lock.

Thames Lock flowerbed.
Thames Lock flowerbed.

The attractive Thames Lock is staffed, and we received a very friendly greeting from the Lock Keeper and her assistant.

Mills at Coxes Lock.
Mills at Coxes Lock.

Former mills at Coxes Lock provide an impressive sight.

Pyrford Lock.
Pyrford Lock.

Spectators at Pyrford Lock are dispersing as we leave the lock.  They were all keen to photograph us and a lovely couple who used to own their own boat offered to help to make our life easier.

Walsham Gates.
Walsham Gates.

Walsham Gates is one of two flood locks along the river and we were pleased to find it open.

Papercourt Lock Cottage.
Papercourt Lock Cottage.

With so many attractive lock cottages at the sixteen locks it’s difficult to know which to film.

Stoke Lock.
Stoke Lock.

Another attractive cottage in a different setting at Stoke Lock.

Godalming.
Godalming.

We paused at Godalming, squashed in close to the winding point at the corner marked by the white line, but not so close we block its use.

Limit of Navigation.
Limit of Navigation.

The limit of navigation is just beyond, at Town Bridge in Godalming.  This is the most southerly point boats can reach on the connected waterway system.

Yes, it is us.
Yes, it is us.

Yes, it really is our boat at the most southerly navigable point on the connected canal system at Godalming.  We’ve previously reached the other compass point extremities so we’ve done them all.

  • North – Tewitfield on the Lancaster Canal
  • South – Godalming on the River Wey
  • West – Llangollen on the Llangollen Canal
  • East – Brandon on the River Little Ouse (also known as Brandon Creek)

We’re moored at Dapdune Wharf overnight and will be gradually making our way back downstream to Woodham Junction at the start of the Basingstoke Canal, ready to film that when the weather improves.  Looking at the forecast that might be a long wait.

Map Updates – June 2016 – Issue 51

I’m pleased to announce the June 2016 updates to my cruising maps are now available.

Extract from Ashby Canal Map
Extract from Ashby Canal Map

You can see a full list of the latest issue of the maps, but those with significant changes this month are:-

Remember, you can update your map to the latest version – free during the first year and a small charge after that.  You can also upgrade to a larger map.  Just email paul@waterwayroutes.co.uk with details of your existing maps for a no obligation quote.

Crick Boat Show

We’ve just finished a busy day setting up our stand at the Crick Boat Show.

IMG_1645
Our stand at the Crick Boat Show

We’ve moved location, a little, to get a bigger stand this year to celebrate our anniversaries, but we are still on the back row of the Boating Marquee.  We’re now in the centre of the back row, between the fire doors.

It’s 10 years since we started producing DVDs and we’ve produced more than 50 DVDs.

The May issue is the 50th monthly update for our maps and we’ve produced more than 60 different maps.

Our stand at the Crick Boat Show
Our stand at the Crick Boat Show

Everything is in stock and we’ll be very pleased to see you.  Please come and say hello if your are visiting the show – but please try to avoid the very busy middle part of Saturday if you would like a long chat.

If you would like to update your maps to the latest version then we can do it at a discounted price if you bring proof of your earlier purchase.  If you email me in advance (paul@waterwayroutes.co.uk) then I can check my records and calculate the discount ready for you.

Grand Union Canal – Leicester Section DVDs

I am pleased to say our Grand Union Canal – Leicester Section DVDs have just been released.

Grand Union Canal - Leicester Section Cover (Combined Version)
Grand Union Canal – Leicester Section Cover (Combined Version)

The Grand Union Canal – Leicester Section DVDs are available in our usual three formats:-

  • Popular – like a television programme showing the highlights of the canal
  • Bowcam – a forward facing camera, speeded up for a little fun, showing the whole canal
  • Combined – both Popular and Bowcam in one box for the best of both worlds, saving money and postage.
Grand Union Canal - Leicester Section DVDs. Popular, Bowcam and Combined (left to right).
Grand Union Canal – Leicester Section DVDs.
Popular, Bowcam and Combined (left to right).

The DVDs follow the Leicester Section of the Grand Union Canal from Norton Junction to Trent Junction, including the Welford, Market Harborough and Loughborough Arms.  We complete our journey along the Erewash Canal from Trent Junction to Langley Mill.

Route covered by the Grand Union Canal - Leicester Section DVDs
Route covered by the Grand Union Canal – Leicester Section DVDs

The Popular and Combined DVDs each include an information booklet and a fold-out map.

Contents of the Grand Union Canal - Leicester Section Combined DVD. Both Popular and Bowcam discs, a fold-out map and an information booklet
Contents of the Grand Union Canal – Leicester Section Combined DVD.
Both Popular and Bowcam discs, a fold-out map and an information booklet

Enjoy this canal from the comfort of your armchair as you watch our Grand Union Canal – Leicester Section DVDs.

We also have the Grand Union Canal – Leicester Section Maps which are available to download in both Acrobat (pdf) and Memory-Map (qct) formats..

Extract from the Grand Union Canal - Leicester Section Map
Extract from the Grand Union Canal – Leicester Section Map

 

Standedge Tunnel

In 2013 we passed through Standedge Tunnel as we were filming for our South Pennine Ring DVDs.  I was steering the boat and didn’t have much chance to appreciate the inside of the tunnel.

Waiting outside the Marsden (North East) Portal of Standedge Tunnel.
Waiting outside the Marsden (North East) Portal of Standedge Tunnel.

Here we are queuing in the early morning before the trip boats start operating.

When I saw Tom & Jan, on Waiouru, were approaching Standedge Tunnel I asked if I could join them and I was delighted to be allowed to sit in the bows all the way through.  You get a much better view that way.  I did offer to steer part way so Tom could admire the tunnel but he preferred to steer all the way.

Looking up the Huddersfield Narrow Canal towards summit.
Looking up the Huddersfield Narrow Canal towards summit.

I caught the train to Greenfield Station and walked the final two and a half miles to join Tom & Jan at the Diggle (South West) Portal to Standedge Tunnel.

Standedge Tunnel, South West Portal.
Standedge Tunnel, South West Portal.

We were soon heading into the Diggle Portal of Standedge Tunnel, with Tom steering and Trevor, the volunteer chaperone, providing advice.

Many different profiles inside Standedge Tunnel.
Many different profiles inside Standedge Tunnel.

The tunnel is difficult to steer as there are many changes of profile inside and the view from the stern, over the roof of the boat is very restricted.

Many sections are exposed rock.
Many sections are exposed rock.

Many parts of Standedge Tunnel are just exposed rock with pointy bits sticking out in all directions, ready to mark the paintwork if the steerer isn’t concentrating all the time.

Wider sections inside Standedge Tunnel.
Wider sections inside Standedge Tunnel.

There are several wider sections inside Standedge Tunnel where steering doesn’t require extra concentration, although it can be difficult to identify which side to keep to at the far end when it narrows again.

Variety of arches
Variety of arches

Arched sections of roof provide interesting reflections, unseen by the steerer, while retaining the sticking our bits of rock to catch the cabin sides.

Standedge Tunnel Trip Boat
Standedge Tunnel Trip Boat

Trip boats operate a short distance into the tunnel from the Marsden (North East) portal and we had to wait at the last check point while one entered the tunnel, then we followed it out.

Standedge Tunnel Trip Boats
Standedge Tunnel Trip Boats

The trip boat moors just outside the Marsden Portal of Standedge Tunnel and the guests watch for us emerging from the tunnel after seeing our approaching headlight when they were inside.

Tom and Chaperone
Tom and Trevor, the Chaperone.

Tom (who has just removed his hard hat) and Trevor, the volunteer chaperone, emerge from the Marsden Portal of Standedge Tunnel.

The Pennines over Standedge Tunnel.
The Pennines over Standedge Tunnel.

The Tunnel Keeper’s Office is on the right, where all boat movements are controlled from.  The Pennines behind, that we’ve just passed through, make an impressive sight.

A big thank you to Tom & Jan for allowing me to join them for this passage.  There are lots more photos on Waiouru’s blog, including much better photos by their son, Daniel.

Map Updates – May 2016 – Issue 50

I’m pleased to announce the May 2016 updates to my cruising maps are now available.

Extract from Warwickshire Ring Cruising Map.
Extract from Warwickshire Ring Cruising Map.

All of the maps have been updated this month, to include the latest Ordnance Survey (OS) background maps. Most have updates to the waterway features too.

I started making monthly updates available shortly after releasing the first maps and I’m pleased to say we’ve reached our 50th monthly issue.

Remember, you can update your map to the latest version – free during the first year (initial map plus 11 monthly updates) and a small charge after that.  You can also upgrade to a larger map.  Just email paul@waterwayroutes.co.uk with details of your existing map(s) for a no obligation quote.

Map Updates – April 2016 – Issue 49

I’m pleased to announce the April 2016 updates to my cruising maps are now available.

Extract from Cotswold Canals Map
Extract from Cotswold Canals Map

You can see a full list of the latest issue of the maps, but those with significant changes this month are:-

Remember, you can update your map to the latest version – free during the first year and a small charge after that.  You can also upgrade to a larger map.  Just email paul@waterwayroutes.co.uk with details of your existing maps for a no obligation quote.

Dudley Canal & Tunnel Trust

We’ve just returned from our first cruise of the season over the past two days, from our home mooring at Sherborne Wharf to Wolverhampton and back.  It’s always nice to be cruising again, and we identified a few items that need fixing after the winter before we start cruising again.

New Swing Bridge across the Dudley No 1 Canal
New Swing Bridge across the Dudley No 1 Canal

On the way we stopped to see the Dudley Canal & Tunnel Trust’s new visitor centre which was opened on 14th March 2016 by HRH The Princess Royal.

Dudley Canal & Tunnel Trust Visitor Centre
Dudley Canal & Tunnel Trust Visitor Centre

There’s a new swing bridge across the canal which provides a level link to the Black Country Living Museum and the boarding point for the trip boats into Dudley Tunnel.  The tunnel portal is just visible in the background.

Dudley Tunnel Trip Boats
Dudley Tunnel Trip Boats

The trip boats are electric and have a low height so they fit into Dudley Tunnel which has such a low profile that most narrowboats will not fit inside.